Thursday, December 31, 2009

MormonTimes - Which school is the best school? Tips for college and life

Check out this website I found at mormontimes.com

Orson Scott Card has wise words for the college-bound and their parents.

Posted via web from Dannis' Posterous

Monsanto Stomps Down Budding Seed Competitors

Here's a more recent article from Associated Press on commondreams.org

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Monsanto's Harvest of Fear

This article, from 2008, is worth another look. I tried to find a more recent article, and none of them are as in-depth as this one. Maybe we should be as careful as our friends in Europe about genetically modified foods...

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Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Safe Travel - With Batteries and other things

Check out this website I found at safetravel.dot.gov

Driving or flying with batteries? Tips for safe travel. Did you know a lot of people were injured by exploding batteries during the past year? My cellphone battery was nearly ready to explode, and I didn't know. Most batteries are safe, but read up, so you know. Also, there are tips for travel with fireworks [in your vehicle, not on commercial airlines!]. Also, how to travel safely with aerosols in cans, and other things that might pose a hazard under the right circumstances. Knowledge is safety.

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NASA - NASA's Shuttle and Rocket Launch Schedule

Want to see a NASA launch? Just go to Cape Canaveral at these times. Titusville is the best place to watch from, according to a volunteer at the US Space and Rocket Museum in Huntsville, AL. He had been to many launches, and says you can simply pull off the road to watch and take pictures. You cannot be very close for safety reasons, but Titusville should give the best view.

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Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Monday, December 21, 2009

Sunday, December 20, 2009

Kansas dad somehow lifts car off 6-year-old girl : Strange Stories : The Buffalo News

Kansas dad somehow lifts car off 6-year-old girl

The Associated Press
Updated: December 18, 2009, 10:01 PM /

A Kansas mother is praising a neighbor as "Superman" after her 6-year-old daughter told her he somehow found the strength to lift a car off her. The girl escaped with minor injuries after she and neighbor Nick Harris said she was pinned under the vehicle.

I love stories like this! Yes, adrenaline might count for the dad's strength to lift the car off his daughter's little friend, but her mother considers this a miracle, and so do I. A string of miracles, that he noticed the accident when it happened, that he was fast enough to save her from being fatally injured, and that the girl's mother was only a block away. She'll have a wonderful Christmas story to tell her children, someday. Heavenly Father inspired several people to action, and the story only tells part of it.

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Mary's Boy Child - Old Fave Song

I grew up with Harry Belafonte music, and my favorite Christmas song by him is a classic: Mary's Boy Child. So... ♫ http://blip.fm/~i2mp7
via Ping.fm
I grew up with Harry Belafonte music, and my favorite Christmas song by him is a classic: Mary's Boy Child. So... ♫ http://blip.fm/~i2mp7

Saturday, December 19, 2009

The Best Way to Travel These Days Is By Bus

Have you heard: According to Time magazine, the coolest way to get around these days is by bus. Buses have always been a hit with people on a budget. That’s been especially true during the recession, as bus ticket sales have jumped more than 10%. These days, you can generally buy a round trip bus ticket for about one-third the amount you’d pay for a train or plane. If you need to go somewhere more than 300 miles away, you’ll probably choose a train or a plane, but for trips within 300 miles, traveling by bus seems to be the coolest way to roll these days.

I love traveling on a bus these days! Huge, clean windows just ripe for movie-taking. Comfy seats. In a wheelchair, the tie-down process is pretty easy, providing you know where your basic tie-down spots are just in case. You can transfer into a seat, or ride in your chair. Drivers are nice and most I've traveled with have been very safety-minded. You will save money over driving most of the time, if you're going to a major city, and your destinations are on public transit. Even mid-sized urban areas can have very convenient transit. But, do compare bus and train ticket prices, on the same day [prices for both can vary from day to day, and holidays are usually more expensive]. I've found Amtrak and Greyhound to be about the same, not counting Greyhound's companion half-fare, which tips that balance in favor of the bus.

For sheer fun, nothing beats Amtrak, to me, though. Flying is cramped, and there's the security lines. Buses are better than planes, but it takes longer. Amtrak...well, the service is so excellent, and the riding pleasant, I never wanted my few trips on it to end.

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Your Favorite Online Games May Not Be as "Free" As You Think

According to MSNBC, at least 60 million people now play online games like FarmVille, CafĂ© World or Pet Society through social media Websites like Facebook and MySpace. The games are a big hit with social network users because they’re easy to play, they’re fun to play with friends, and because they’re relatively free. Unfortunately, there may be serious hidden costs to these online games, which may make you think twice about playing.

Yeah, these online games are fun, but there are other services that ask for that permission to share data with social networks. I'm guilty. This article gave me a lot to think about. Just about every social networking site asks for your birthdate, and if you don't give it, you can't join some of them. Some don't give you an option to hide it. But, without the info, would I have found half my Facebook friends who went to high school with me? This is my ongoing dilemma. The carrot is under my nose, and sometimes, I can't help but bite it. Connecting with old friends and making new ones is the main attraction of social networking for me, anyway, as a shut-in.

Read up, and you decide :) The Internet has its risks, but so does talking about your home life at work or school.

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Worst Sci Fi Covers Ever!

Time Hoppers - Dannis' Vote For Worst Sci Fi Cover http://ping.fm/2ZfxN
via Ping.fm
Time Hoppers - Dannis' Vote For Worst Sci Fi Cover http://ping.fm/2ZfxN

Star Trek's Patrick Stewart to be knighted - mirror.co.uk

I think this is wonderful! Patrick Stewart is a terrific actor, and I am very happy for him.

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Friday, December 18, 2009

Shellie Ross Twitter: Mom Tweets Son's Death in Pool - ABC News

It amazes me, how insensitive society can be. Rumors are flying about this news report. I read several of them before coming here to share my thoughts. First, my heartfelt prayers go out to this poor mother and her family, and to her 11-year old son, who thought the gate was closed securely, and who was first to find the toddler floating in the pool. She was cleaning out the chicken coop, a dirty, messy, daily job. Her 11-year old son was there to help her with the watching. No, you can't expect a child to do a mom's job, but what is this mother supposed to do? Cleaning out the chicken coop probably didn't take all that long. Every mother has this kind of experience, and you just pray that nothing happens during these times when you can't be vigilant. You can't hire a sitter every time you take a bath, fall asleep on the couch for a few, have to do a job like the coop. You just hope that nothing happens while your attention is divided.

She probably dropped everything to search for her son, and sent her older son after the phone to call 911 while she got him out. He was floating, which says to me he hadn't been there long. Thirty mins is plenty of time to get to the ER, and then, you wait.

A mother cannot be everyplace at one time. It is a horrible feeling, to miss a child and go looking, and I have felt that many, many times. I am fortunate that every time, I found my girls, safe and sound. But, I experienced four miscarriages. I have known grief, and known it well. I have been the anxious mother, worried about her baby, only to find that your worst fear is confirmed. You don't grieve a baby in the womb any less than an older child. Having other children doesn't replace the child you'll never see grow up.

Every mother fears that something of this scale might happen. When it does, it makes the news, whether or not that poor mother tweets, or blogs, about it.

I imagine that she tweeted on her cellphone from the hospital while she waited for doctors to try to revive her son. Is this any reason to criticize the poor soul, when waits in the ER drag on and on and seem like a LOT longer than they really are? I was no stranger to the ER when about her older son's age, going there with my mother, who had chronic illness all my young life. Maybe I paid my dues then, because I only had to go to the ER with my older daughter twice, and not a single time with my younger. But, I have listened to the stories of many moms who had to go with babies and children of whatever age. They are all colored with that sense of panic, of frantic prayers, of lost sleep. But, for me, I am more acquainted with grief, as a mother.

There are stages to grief, something that paramedic should have known about. My mother was an ER nurse for many years, and an ideal person to be there for frantic mothers. She told me many stories of how people react when terrible things happen. I can add my crisis and grief experiences to that. In the crisis, no two people react the same way. So, to say that someone screams and cries and carries on is totally not a valid assessment. Some people express their worry that way, it's true. But, not everyone reacts that way. I didn't. People who scream or cry aren't weak. It's just that they have a different way of reacting to something traumatic. People who don't scream aren't cold. It's just different.

I can see that a frantic mom, waiting in the ER, with that dread all mothers know, might Tweet about it. This picture might have been in her phone from another day. How critical, those who jump to conclusions! I saw one news report that said this poor mother tweeted for nine hours straight instead of watching her son. Is that fair? How long does it take, to type out 140 characters, while doing other things? How unusual is it, to want people to pray for you, when you're in a crisis? I wish there had been Twitter when I went to the ER early one morning to be admitted, not knowing if my baby I carried for 16 weeks would survive. I would have used it, to reach out to my Christian friends, to ask them to pray with me. I wish I had been able to use Twitter, the afternoon, when I came home from the hospital, too drained of tears to cry for my son. I would have to wait many more hours to call other relatives, who were at work. My father had died two weeks earlier. My mother, six years earlier. My husband was too much in shock to talk about it. Men and women grieve differently, I would find out later. My mother in law was the one most able to help me, and my sister, but they were at work when this happened. I lost my other babies earlier. I miss them just as much.

And, the stages of grief begin with two days of numbness. You cry, oh, yes, but it's all kind of far away. This is the body's way of protecting you from shock [as in drop in core body temp, which is life-threatening]. Sometimes, this happens to people, but most time, the cocoon of denial protects you from the horrible news. There isn't a lot of emotion. It isn't that you're a cold fish. You can't believe that it happened, that your wanted, loved child...is gone. Nothing in life prepares you for such a loss, of the child that EVERYTHING in life told you would outlive you.

Later, the grief, the pain, and the anger, they get miserable. You move through the stages in uneven jerks, and it's a process that takes 6 months to 2 years. Society gives you 2 weeks to get over it. You don't. You just learn to live around a big, gaping hole in your life. Many marriages don't survive the loss of a child.

I will pray for this poor family, but I will also pray for those who didn't think before tweeting judgmentally. Every tweet, every status message, every blog has a flesh-and-blood person there, who hurts, who laughs, and who has opinions. Let us realize the limitations of the posts, the news stories, and even how well we know each other. Who really knows another person, really? We make guesses. Sometimes, those guesses can be so clear cut that they seem real. But, when it comes down to it, we need to love each other, to give a little slack, to care about each other. Heavenly Father knows us well enough to know what is in our most secret thoughts, and He loves all 6 billion of us, even despite our shortcomings.

May we only have thoughts of love towards families in the news who are experiencing these living nightmares. I, for one, would never wish such a thing on another person.

Posted via web from Dannis' Posterous

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Climate change threatens life in Shishmaref, Alaska

600 people. Up to $200 million to relocate them. And, they are just one community of many whose homes are literally crumbling, because the permafrost is thawing. It's not simply a matter of relocating them; they have a unique culture, language, and lifestyle that is also threatened. Shall we lose these proud people, and their cultures that can't be replaced, because of money? When New Orleans was threatened, we sent money and aid, although things were very disorganized. Aid to a much smaller group could be organized, and the needs of the people considered. We depend on governments to do what we cannot do for ourselves. These are our people, our Native American peoples, who are threatened. Come on, Congress! If we can give billions to corporate entities who didn't do anything better than to squander a lot of it on CEO bonuses, can't we give some money to these poor folks in Alaska, who probably won't even have to have 20 million dollars a community? Native Americans aren't wasteful like Big Business. Let's help these folks! You can't put a price on human life. It's time to decide what's more important to us in this country: Money, or Human Life. I choose Life.

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Environmental Justice Foundation EJF: Climate Refugees Report

Download this free report, and little reminders you can print out of everyday things you can do to help. Debates rage on, but what can it hurt for each one of us to do something, even something that seems inconsequential? We may be a low income household, but we are trying to reduce our carbon footprint and conserve water. If we can do it, you can do it :)

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Tuesday, December 15, 2009

11 Things to Avoid When Using Twitter | Tech N' Marketing

Check out this website I found at technmarketing.com

This article is really useful. I knew better, but learned some things, and I think every newbie to Twitter should read it. I've seen so many newbies who only talk about their business...kind of how I did for a short period before I learned better. When I started thinking about what my followers might like instead of how to increase my business, I got more followers and made a whole bunch of Twitter friends. Now, I always look for folks' Twitter ID if i run upon them elsewhere, these interesting and creative folks I want to know better.

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Top 5 Steps after Joining Twitter | Tech N' Marketing

Check out this website I found at technmarketing.com

When you finally talk your friends into trying Twitter, give them this link. For Internet newbies, Twitter is very simple, and a whole lot of fun.

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More Street Paintings

Amazing chalk drawings! Follow the link, and see my previous post for more. I wish I could see these.

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Chalk Drawings That Rock

Check out Jeff Bridges' web site for more. Wow. Edgar Mueller, I am a fan of your chalk paintings! I used to dabble in that when we lived in Provo, UT, but can't get down there any more.

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Monday, December 14, 2009

The Upper Room Homeless Photo Project | Published Images

What does a homeless person look like? These photos, taken by homeless men as part of a project, show a glimpse of what it's like to be homeless. It doesn't matter that these pictures were taken in Ohio; it could've been Atlanta, San Francisco, New York, or Kansas City. If you think their clothes look too nice for them to be homeless, keep in mind that shelters provide donated clothing, and a lot of that is very nice. These people are keeping clean and neat so they can interview for jobs. They have access to a day shelter to help them with this, and some lived in night shelters, the ones who could get a place.

Do a search on homelessness and you will see the crisis. Many can't get a place in a shelter. They are the ones you see with the not-so-nice clothes. Could you keep clean and neat sleeping in business doorways or underneath a highway bridge? Would you get sound sleep? Could you stay healthy?

Most of the homeless are honest people who got a run of bad luck. There are no more of them addicted to drugs than if you knew how many of your neighbors had drug problems. It's not restricted to a neighborhood. Drug problems make homelessness more likely, and complicate matters, but should we ignore the ones with drug problems and help the others? People with addiction problems are people, too, who made a terrible mistake, and they are paying the price for it, every day.

A significant part of them have too many health problems to be expected to get a job and work. Yet, it is nearly impossible for a person so disabled to have a place to stay while Social Security tries to fit them into the schedule. It's a process that can take over 4 years and require a lawyer. We screen crooks so well that we screen out most of the people who really need Social Security Disability. It is very easy for a disabled person who cannot work to become homeless. It is very easy to lose it once you get it. I have seen a friend lose hers, and to me, it was a clear-cut case of a single mom who needed it. She just wasn't able physically to get up and fight for it again.

More and more whole families are on the streets. If it is very difficult to find a place for one homeless person, how much more difficult it is to find a place for a whole family at once! Many shelters are equipped for singles, because in the 80's, the homeless were mostly singles. That changed in the 90's, and still, there are few shelters that can accommodate a whole family unit.

These pictures mostly show men, but they are not representative of all homeless people. Don't be afraid of homeless people. If a few of them actively beg, would it kill you to give them a dollar? All of them are not fakes [there are impersonators out there]. Most of them wouldn't be caught dead begging. Yet, you can't help all of them. You can help one. Give someone homeless a ride, and maybe a hot meal, if you can afford it. Carry a print-out of shelters in your area [look up http://www.unitedway.org and put in your zip, then search shelters. You might add soup kitchens]. Then, give the list or lists when a beggar approaches you. Be kind, though. Some homeless people don't know how to read. Some might be low-vision. Even so, such a list might help a lot more people than just that one beggar.

Most of all, give to food banks. Give a can of meat, not green beans. Peanut butter is usually on the list. You can use United Way's lists to know what and where to donate. We only use about 20% of our stuff. Maybe you've got clothes you're saving for when you lose weight, or for your daughter when she gets bigger. Think about donating. Make sure all clothes are clean. Don't be shy about donating clothes with stains or broken zippers, though; these might be sent to other countries where they repair first and replace later. You'd be surprised at how good those ladies in third world countries are at cleaning or repairing clothes. Ditto anything donated.

Rethink how you think about the homeless, whether out on the streets, or in shelters and transitional housing. They are no more likely to be criminals or on drugs than you. Most are not homeless for long. Those that are may be disabled and unable to win their Social Security Disability Case or may be waiting for a judgment. Don't assume that those fast-food and paper delivery jobs are so easy to get nowadays; a lot of times, they are not. And, would you think a disabled person can lift those 25- or 50-pound sacks of vegetables up on the table for cutting, for long? Most jobs at minimum wage involve a lot of heavy lifting. I know, because I went from job to job while trying to put myself through college, and I think if I could've found office work, I might still be in the workforce, because I would be healthier. It's easy to judge when you aren't in the situation.

Take a look at the people in these photographs. Do they look that much different than you?

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Flu shots - get them both now

Atlanta Low Income Issues Examiner

Flu shots - get them both now
December 14, 8:06 PMAtlanta Low Income Issues ExaminerDannis Cole
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With all the shortages of H1N1 vaccine, some may have forgotten about getting their H1N1 vaccine, or the separate flu shot for the more routine kinds of flu. The time to get them if you haven't is now.

Most chain drugstores have shots available. You fill out a short health form, and one of the staff comes out to give you your shots. There has been a nasal spray available, but for certain age groups.

Use this H1N1 locator to find the nearest place to get yours. H1N1 info is here.  Find both here at American Lung Association's Flu Shot Locator. Just put in your zip code, and you get a Google Map with some locations. The site tells you where to search for more. Whatever source you use, do call first. Supplies are still shipped in small batches.

See my list of links on the right for more helpful links. Just added many links to my help list for Spanish-speakers [tricky, since I don't speak it]

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Help with groceries and food

Atlanta Low Income Issues Examiner

Help with groceries and food
December 14, 1:20 PMAtlanta Low Income Issues ExaminerDannis Cole
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Most low income families will cut the food budget, because that's where the leeway is. Poor nutrition can degrade health, and lack of health insurance plus bad nutrition can turn a person with bad health into a dying person.

Food banks and church food pantries are a stopgap measure until a person can get Food Stamps. Anyone can go if they're having a rough time. Usually the person is asked to fill out a form, and prove income with utiltiy bills, paycheck stubs, etc. Call the agency before you go, so you have the needed proofs with you.

Once you go in, you will have a short appointment with a social worker the first time. Then, you are told how often you can come back. Everyone gets a sack of food with staples, and maybe some frozens. Usually, grocery stores donate all their day-old baked goods on a certain day.

Check the United Way for locations, hours, and phone numbers. Call 211 in Atlanta, or go to United Way's Atlanta Website. Put your zipcode or city in the search window, and look up food.

Check out the page on Examiner.com for links to all sorts of help! Links to the right, under the ad blocks, are your key to finding low income services of all sorts in metro Atlanta.

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Finding low-income housing in Atlanta

Atlanta Low Income Issues Examiner

Finding low-income housing in Atlanta
October 30, 3:14 AMAtlanta Low Income Issues ExaminerDannis Cole
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If you are mobility impaired, you need to do extra research into finding accessible housing.
If you are mobility impaired, you need to do extra research into finding accessible housing.
Photo by Dannis Cole on N Peachtree Rd in Chamblee

If you are moving to Atlanta, you may be thinking, more jobs, more services, more choices. Oh, yes, Atlanta is a great place to live! There are more disability services, and more jobs. But, there is also more competition for all of this. MARTA gives a way to cut your transportation costs by a good bit, but food may be more expensive than rural areas, while gas may be cheaper. Car repair is available in many price ranges. There are many, many free things to do here. But, getting into low-income housing is tough. It takes patience, and planning.

On the Internet, you can find help for this daunting task. For a database of low-income housing, there is HUD's Web Site. Lists of resources vary from public housing, which is scaled to income, and you live among other low-income folks; subsidized housing, in mixed-income complexes; and various programs designed to help you afford a house of your own. Each program has its own set of rules. Accessible housing has its own difficulties, because accessibility definitions seem to vary with each place to live! People with disabilities vary in what they need. You must make sure that you explain your needs, and ask your independent living center or occupational therapist for advice. There are low-cost ways to make a regular place into an accessible one, depending on what's needed. Another excellent site is GA Housing Search. Listings here have details, if given by the landlord, of accessibility. Some that don't include this can be accessible; many landlords don't know much about how accessible their apartments are.

You can get ideas from NPR's article about Concrete Change that addresses visitability, or the ability of a person with mobility handicaps to enter a building. If you visit the Concrete Change website, there is a cornucopia of information on how to make a house accessible. A new house can be outfitted for about $200.00, more or less. Yes, the decimal point is in the right place. If you know a house builder, spread the word. For a building under construction, the small changes to make it accessible are cheap! For rentals, there are portable ramps that you can take with you when you move, and ways to use your furniture to help yourself. A portable ramp is preferable to a built one; a permanent ramp usually causes housing values in the whole neighborhood to go down. Aluminum ramps don't require rebuilding every few years, they don't rust, and require no maintenance. There are also ramps made of old tires that do not degrade. Wood ramps require maintenance; what if the recipient isn't able to sand and paint, or even to bend far enough to inspect for termites, etc.?

For more information, see

How to plan your move - visit first

Check out the page on Examiner.com for links to all sorts of help! Links to the right, under the ad blocks, are your key to finding low income services of all sorts in metro Atlanta.

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Holiday Guide for low income folks

Atlanta Low Income Issues Examiner

Holiday Guide for low income folks
December 14, 12:53 PMAtlanta Low Income Issues ExaminerDannis Cole
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The holidays can be very stressful for anyone when you consider the costs of presents, lights, tree decorations, and feeding extra relatives. This is multiplied for low income families. Tight budgets can lead to overspending and credit debt.

Don't reach for the credit card. Use your debit card as a credit. Most debit cards have plans you can sign up with for free through your bank, or online if you have a computer; don't use public computers as in libraries for anything connected with your finances. Then, you can use the points for various things from their catalog.

Keep a firm check on your finances. Consider gifts of service rather than things. Instead of wrapping paper, why not just use newspaper [comics are good] or a grocery bag? Remember, it's the thought that counts.

Also, many  agencies offer Santa programs to help supply gifts to mostly the children, though some include fixings for dinner and maybe gifts for adults, too. You can check with the United Way to see if these services are available. You might need to supply proof of your income such as utility bills, Food Stamp letter, etc.

There are also Christmas programs for the homeless. Check with United Way. If in metro Atlanta, you may dial 211 from a phone. Many churches offer assistance to low income families of any faith. United Way is a referral service, and they have lists of phone numbers and websites where you can try to get help. There are day shelters where the homeless can use a phone, get a shower, and have a warm place to rest between job hunting, or just to stay until your shelter opens its doors again [some, like Salvation Army, make all residents leave after breakfast, and they may return for supper]. Soup kitchens are in various locations, and the disabled often make use of them if they are not housebound, to cut down on their food budget. No questions are asked, just come and enjoy a meal.

It can be very difficult to find a place in a shelter, and the average stay is only three weeks. The next stop, for those lucky enough to get places for them [and maybe, their families], is transitional housing. This, too, is difficult to get into. Those who graduate from transitional housing to housing adjusted to income usually move into either subsidized [mixed-income] housing or traditional public housing. It is not necessary to wait for shelter or transitional housing space, to apply for housing through HUD. The links here are to HUD's search engines for each.

Check out the page on Examiner.com for links to all sorts of help! Links to the right, under the ad blocks, are your key to finding low income services of all sorts in metro Atlanta.

Posted via web from Dannis' Posterous

Saturday, December 12, 2009

More HP Frustration - Open Letter to HP

I am hoping someone at HP has a heart, and the power to help me. I am not confident sending my PC in to get it serviced will fix it, since they had the opportunity to do so earlier. I don't want another IQ. I want a totally different model. I don't care if it's a desktop or a laptop, I need something that will run Linux successfully, a version of Windows that is still supported by Microsoft, and with the specs this IQ had. It can be refurbished. After a whole year of troubles, I feel I am justified to make this request. The world on the Internet is my witness.

Here is a letter I wrote to Mark Hurd, Chairman of the Board, Chief Executive Officer and President, Hewlett-Packard Company. I couldn't put the whole thing there, because of the 3500 word limit. This is the whole letter, without the references to case numbers, etc which probably made my letter too long.

http://www.youtube.com/user/dannistories#p/u/45/CE9KEN2Ng3o
The video is my book trailer, done from my bed with my computer's webcam, before my Vista shut down completely. If anyone from HP wants to know who it is that's making this request, they can see and hear me on this trailer. I am in my bed all day, most every day. Every library I visited to promote my book, I had to literally get out of bed to do this.
=================================================================================================================

Sat 12 Dec 2009 18:53:38 EST
Dear Sir:
I am writing to you because I feel I am getting the runaround about my HP IQ506t. From day one, I have had nothing but problems. Now I finally get a Case Manager, and he wants to charge me for service saying the machine is out of warranty. I have chatted and gone on HP forums and tried to do what they told me to do. I replace the DVD myself per HP Service, and the machine was sent for repair. It still had problems, and I cannot find my records of past then because I had to reformat the hard drive after yet another failure, and lost files.

I am disabled. I cannot lift my PC and so must wait for help before opening the case, though I am comfortable with swapping boards, seating chips, replacing drives, etc because I am a former computer tech. I know how to troubleshoot a machine. I have given this machine every chance and even installed a dual boot system so when Vista went down, at least I could limp along with the Linux problems, including no sound and iffy video. I have problems with both operating systems. Unexpected screen dimming/freezes/software failures. With Vista, blue screens, unexpected shutdowns, slowdowns, software errors-especially with the TouchScreen software and calendar in that, operating system errors. I provided details in chats to your techs. After many reformats, replacing the hard drive [to add capacity, there is nothing wrong with the original because it worked on my daughter's machine before her LCD got cracked, this was another case with you].

I was told the last time I chatted with a tech before the referral to Richard, Case Manager, that I was under warranty. Richard informs me the warranty expired 90 days after the service, which would have been October.

What I want is for HP to provide me with an equivalent machine [refurbished ok, and you know prices went down on an equivalent machine since my sister purchased this one for me].

It must work with Linux and Windows, and I am willing to install the dual boot myself. I want a machine that works and this year of limping along has left me very frustrated with your service.

All who spoke with me/chatted with me were very polite, but they read off computer screens and have to put me through the drill every time. Your servers don't seem to communicate with each other, and I have to give a lot of info repeatedly. I realize you are working on this, and I have been a fan of HP machines ever since my first Compaq Presario in 1998 [and the subsequent purchase of Compaq by HP only improved things].

I have found that some models are better than others. My HP IQ506t worked wonderfully well, the short times it was up. My nephew got the exact same model and had nothing but trouble with it, also [like me, he is experienced with the nuts and bolts of things through his work]. I saw a lot of complaints on amazon.com and other forums about this particular machine at the time my sister bought it.

I am blogging about my experience, and would like to see what you intend to do. I am not satisfied about the offer of $50 off to get service for $289 plus tax, though I was nice about it to Richard. There should be records of my struggle across HP's servers.

I think I am entitled to a PC that works for what I wanted this one for, editing video and doing 3D animation and book covers for my science fiction self-publishing business, which is not profitable but keeps my mind active. This was my dream machine, and I am crushed that I am left with writing this email on a machine that has no sound, will not boot up in Vista, and the touchscreen doesn't work in Linux Ubuntu 9.04; I tried to install Ubuntu 9.10 and had to roll it back.

As a shut-in, the PC is my gateway to friends and family, since I can't get out much except for infrequent times when the weather is warm enough [summer]. I am on Food Stamps and receive Meals on Wheels. I receive Social Security Disability, and so am on a fixed income. If not for my sister's help, I would not be able to stay in my home.

Please send me a machine that will work for my intended use. Then, I will box up the old one and send it to you. I expect that you will respect the Christmas Spirit, or whatever holiday cheers you, and act accordingly.

Sincerely,
Dannis Cole
dannistories@gmail.com
http://posterous.dannistories.com [my blog]

Dannis Cole
http://dannistories.com
Therapeutic Science Fiction. No profanity. No explicit sex. No sickening gore. No excuses.
Chat Google Talk: dannistories Skype: dannistories


Dannis
http://dannistories.com
Therapeutic Science Fiction

Posted via email from Dannis' Posterous

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